Study Guide (go by the chapters assigned by your instructor)
(Different lecture sections break up the tests differently)
Click here to go to Class Videos (best way to prepare is to watch the videos)

.....

ALWAYS use the videos if you missed a class AND for Exam reviews

Although the vocabulary is very important, you should
concentrate on the 'Be able to:' sections first!

Chapter 5 on the Sun has been moved to the next section on Stars

Chapter 6 - Terrestrial Planets

---------- Overview of the Solar System (From Ch 8.1)

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 8.1.
Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = Much more information provided in class lecture/videos.

Be able to:
- describe the scale and structure of the solar system and list the
basic differences between the terrestrial and the Jovian planets .

Be able to list:
- the names of the planets in order
- the sizes of the planets compared to the Earth

---------- Ch. 6.1 & 6.2 - Earth as a Planet

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 6.1 and 6.2
Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = More information provided in class lecture/videos.


Be able to define:
age of the Earth
seismic waves
mantle
crust
differentiation
plate tectonics
volcanism
magnetic field
conduction
convection
radiation

density
ozone
greenhouse effect
greenhouse gases
inner and outer cores
plate tectonics
spreading centers
subduction zones
continental collisions
hot spots
transform faults
Earth's atmosphere - composition
Greenhouse Effect


Be able to:
- discuss how Earth's atmosphere helps heat us as well as protect us.
- outline our current model of Earth's interior structure and describe
some experimental techniques used to establish this model
- summarize the evidence for continental drift and discuss the
physical processes that drive it
- describe the nature and origin of Earth's magnetosphere.
- describe the role of seismology
- explain the role of differentiation of the Earth
- summarize and compare the basic properties of the Earth


Be able to list:
-the major parts of the Earth from the crust inward



---------- Ch. 6.3 - The Moon

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 6.3.

Be able to define:
natural satellite
synchronous rotation

tidal lock
terminator
limb
impact craters
mare
rays
impact hypothesis


Be able to:
- describe the consequences of gravitational interactions between
Earth and the Moon

- describe why we do not see the back side of the Moon.
- explain how dynamic events early in the Moon's history formed its major surface features
- discuss the formation and evolution of the Moon.
- summarize and compare the basic properties of the Moon


Be able to list:
- the differences between the maria and the highlands on the Moon


---------- Ch 6.4 ‚€“ Mercury

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 6.4

Be able to define:
wrinkle ridges

Be able to:
- describe the general surface of Mercury

---------- Ch 6.5 ‚€“ Venus
Reading Hints = read all of Ch 6.5

Be able to define:
retrograde rotation
runaway greenhouse effect


Be able to:
- explain the relationships between surface features & planet size
- explain why some planets lack an atmosphere
- identify unique features on Venus

‚€¶‚€¶‚€¶.Ch 6.6 - Mars & Comparative Planetology

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 6.6
Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = Basics on Mars BUT Comparative Planetology added to end of Mars video for Terrestrial Planets.

Be able to define:
Rovers
Curiosity
canals
Schiaparelli
Lowell
Valles Marineris
Olympus Mons
Martian dust
Martian impact craters
Martian volcanoes
ancient Martian climate
life on Mars
Phobos
Deimos


Be able to:
- describe how the atmospheres of Venus and Mars differ from one
another and from Earth's
- compare the surface of Mercury with that of the Moon and the
surfaces of Venus and Mars with that of Earth
- discuss the similarities and differences in the geological histories of
the four terrestrial planets
- describe how we know that Mars once had running water and a thick
atmosphere.

 

Chapter 7 ‚€“ The Outer Solar System

---------- Ch 7.1 & 7.2 Jupiter & Its Moons

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 7.1-7.2
Class Lecture (Videos) Hints -

Be able to define:
Jovian planets
belts
zones
Great Red Spot
atmospheric composition of Jupiter
thermal infrared radiatiion
internal structures of Jupiter
liquid metallic hydrogen
ring systems
Io
Europa
Ganymede
Callisto
Galilean satellites

Be able to:
- describe how the Galilean moons form a miniature solar system
around Jupiter and exhibit a wide range of properties.
- describe the nature and detailed structure of Saturn's rings.
Be able to list:
- the similarities and the differences among the four Jovian worlds.

 

---------- Ch 7.3 Saturn & Its Moons

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 7.3
Class Lecture (Videos) Hints -

Be able to define:
atmospheric composition of Saturn
internal structures of Saturn
liquid metallic hydrogen
ring systems
Cassini spacecraft
Cassini‚€™s division
Roche‚€™s limit
shepherd satellites
Co-orbiting Satellites
Mimas

Enceleladus
Titan
Rings A,B,C,D,F, and E


Be able to:
- discuss the composition and origin of the atmosphere on Titan,
Saturn's largest moon.
- describe the nature and detailed structure of Saturn's rings.

Be able to list:
- the similarities and the differences among the moons of Saturn

---------- Ch 7.4 Uranus
Reading Hints = read all of Ch 7.4

Be able to define:
atmospheric properties of Uranus
internal structures of Uranus
Miranda


Be able to:

- describe the tilt of Uranus
- explain how Uranus was discovered

 

---------- Ch 7.5 Neptune

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 7.5

Be able to define:
atmospheric properties of Neptune
Great Dark Spot
internal structures of Neptune
arc-rings
Triton

Be able to:
- explain how both chance and calculation played major roles in the
discovery of Neptune.
- explain why astronomers think Neptune's moon, Triton, was
captured by that planet.

---------- Ch 7.6 Kuiper Belt Objects

Reading Hints = read intro of Ch 7.6 but skip 7.6a and 7.6b

Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = Much more information provided in class lecture/videos on Pluto and the other KBO‚€™s (Kuiper Belt Objects)

Be able to define:
KBO's
Pluto

Mike Brown

Be able to:
- explain how the Pluto & Charon system is fundamentally different from
all other planet & moon systems.

- explain why Pluto is no longer a planet
- explain the importance of Eris

 

Chapter 8 - Origin of the Solar System, Debris, & Exosolar planets.

---------- Ch 8.1 Overview - Did Earlier

---------- Ch Ch 8.2a - 8.2c Asteroids, Comets, & Meteorites

Reading Hints = read all of Ch 8.2a - 8.2c

Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = MUCH more information provided in class lecture/videos.

Be able to define:
asteroids
Trojan asteroids
Gaspra
Ida
Lagrangian points
Earth-crossing asteroids
meteor showers
comets
Tunguska Event
sublime
asteroid belt
Halley's Comet
comet head
comet ion tail
comet dust tail
comet nucleus
solar wind
aerogel
long-period comets
short-period comets
Oort cloud
Kuiper belt
dirty snowball model
meteors
meteoroids
meteorite
bolides
fireballs
Stony meteorites
Stony-Iron meteorites
Iron meteorites
Carbonaceous meteorites
Gene Shoemaker

Alvarez Team
meteorite impact craters
mass extinctions
NEOs

Be able to:
- explain what cometary orbits tell us about the probable origin of
comets.
- describe the composition and structure of a typical comet
- explain how a cometary tail forms.
- summarize the orbital and physical properties of meteoroids and
explain how these bodies are related to asteroids and comets.
- summarize the orbital and physical properties of the major groups of
asteroids.

Ch 8.3 - The Origin of the Solar System

Reading Hints = skip 8.3a, read 8.3b, watch the video for terms and concepts.

Class Lecture (Videos) Hints = Quizzes and Exams based on video and not so much textbook.

Be able to define:
conservation of angular momentum
Helmholtz contraction
Solar Nebula Hypothesis
solar nebula
condensation sequence
planetesimals
accretion

Be able to:
- outline the process by which planets form as natural by-products of
star formation.
- explain the importance of cratering as a planetary process
- list the major facts that any theory of solar system formation must
explain and indicate how the leading theory accounts for them